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Mar 9th, 2011

AMD Radeon HD 6990 4GB Review @ PCPerspective

PC Perspective - AMD Radeon HD 6990 4GB Dual GPU Cayman Graphics Card
Graphics card that are this well endowed don’t come along very often; the last was the Radeon HD 5970 from AMD back in November of 2009. In a world where power efficiency is touted as a key feature it has become almost a stigma to have an add-in card in your system that might pull 350-400 watts of power. Considering we were just writing about a complete AMD Fusion platform that used 34 watts IN TOTAL under load, it is an easy task to put killer gaming products like the HD 6990 in an unfair and unreasonable light.

But we aren’t those people. Do most people need a $700, 400 watt graphics card? Nope. Do they want it though? Yup. And we are here to show it to you.

Both AMD and NVIDIA have written this story before: take one of your top level GPUs and double them up on a single PCB or card design to plug into a single PCI Express slot and get maximum performance. CrossFire (or SLI) in a single slot – lots to like about that.

The current GPU lineup paints an interesting picture with the Fermi-based GTX 500 series from NVIDIA and the oddly segregated AMD HD 6800 and HD 6900 series of cards. Cayman, the redesigned architecture AMD released as the HD 6970 and HD 6950, brings a lot of changes to the Evergreen design used in previous cards. It has done fairly well in the market though it didn’t improve the landscape for AMD discrete graphics as much as many had thought it would and NVIDIA’s graphics chips have remained very relevant.